THE Q-COLLAR HAS UNDERGONE SIX YEARS OF RESEARCH COMPRISED OF MORE THAN 20 LABORATORY AND CLINICAL STUDIES.

7

Pre-Clinical
Studies

16

Clinical
Studies

5

Tolerability
Studies

500+

Study
Participants

500,000+

Impacts over
20 g's

REPEATED STUDIES HAVE SHOWN THAT THE Q-COLLAR HELPS PROTECT THE BRAIN FROM SPORTS-RELATED IMPACTS.

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SAFETY


Research shows that use of the Q-Collar has no negative impact on athletic performance. During testing with hundreds of athletes, there have been no known adverse events linked to the wearing of the Q-Collar. However, the Q-Collar may not be suitable for everyone. Always read the label and follow the directions for use.

EFFICACY


Independent clinical trials with hockey, football and soccer players, using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and accelerometers to measure head impacts, has shown that athletes who wore the Q-Collar over the course of a sport’s season had significantly less changes to the structure of their brains than those who did not wear the Q-Collar.

Hockey Study


The first pilot study involving athletes was with a high school hockey team and used advanced imaging techniques to compare pre- and mid-season changes to white matter structure in the brain. In half a season of play, each athlete received an average of 190 impacts over 20g, with an average impact level of 38g. As shown with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), athletes not wearing the Q-Collar showed statistically significant changes in white matter microstructure of the brain, while athletes wearing the collar showed no significant changes despite similar levels in accumulated accelerations from head impacts.

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FEMALE SOCCER STUDY


A study similar in design to the football and hockey studies was used to evaluate the Q-Collar in females and in non-helmeted applications. For this clinical study, comprised of 46 female soccer players, half of the athletes wore the Q-Collar and half did not, serving as the control group. Advanced brain imaging of all athletes in the study were conducted pre-season and then again post-season. The imaging showed that athletes wearing the Q-Collar had no significant structural changes to the brain, while those who did not wear the Q-Collar experienced significant structural changes.

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FOOTBALL STUDY I


The second athlete study involved two elite high school football teams to perform a comparison between pre-and post-season advanced imaging results. Over a full season of play, each athlete received nearly 800 impacts over 20g. As with the hockey study, the group of athletes not wearing the Q-Collar demonstrated significant changes to the microstructure of the brain when assessed with advanced imaging techniques (DTI). Those wearing the Q-Collar showed no significant changes.

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FOOTBALL STUDY II


The same football teams referred to in the previous study also underwent functional MRI testing (fMRI). fMRI is used to identify changes in the brain’s activity levels while responding to cognitive stimulus. In the absence of other clinical symptoms, the study detected significant changes in brain activity in players who did not wear the Q-Collar throughout the football season, while there was no detectable change in players who wore the Q-Collar.

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